Masters of Water-Colour Painting

James Holland commenced his artistic career by painting flowers on pottery at the factory of James Davenport at Burslem. He came to London and continued to paint flowers. After a visit to Paris he devoted himself to landscapes. Subsequently he visited Venice, and produced, in both oils and water colours, some excellent paintings remarkable for their brilliant colouring (see Plate XXII).

James Baker Pyne, born at Bristol, was a self-taught artist. He also is noted for his brilliant colouring, but there is a want of solidity in his painting. He visited the Continent and travelled as far as Italy (see Plate XXIII). His landscapes were chiefly river and lake subjects. He published “The English Lake District” and “The Lake Scenery of England,” illustrated with lithographs of his works. He was a member of the Society of British Artists, and became a vice-president. Like Girtin, the illustrious young painter Richard Parkes Bonington was cut off in life at the early age of twenty-seven. He was born at Arnold, near Nottingham. Whilst still a boy he was taken by his parents to Calais, where he received some instruction in water colours from Francia. Later the family settled in Paris. Here Bonington resided the greater part of his life. He made a few visits to England, and on the last occasion he was taken ill and died of consumption. He practised at the Louvre and the Institut, and also received instruction from Baron Gros. His paintings, in oil and water colours, were almost entirely executed in France; he, however, made one visit to Italy. In Paris his works were chiefly architectural with street scenes, admirably executed, whilst his landscapes with fine atmospheric effects (see Plate XXIV) display great freedom in execution. It is somewhat remarkable that after Cotman and Bonington had, in the first part of the nineteenth century, developed a style so greatly appreciated at the present time, so many of the landscape painters in water colours in the early Victorian era should still have adhered to the old restricted methods. Constable exercised considerable influence on the French landscape painting in oil, whilst Bonington showed the French artists the capabilities of water colours, which they did not fail to appreciate.

H. M. Cundall.

see caption

PLATE I

“WINDSOR CASTLE: VIEW OF THE ROUND AND
DEVIL’S TOWERS FROM THE BLACK ROCK”

BY PAUL SANDBY, R.A.

(Acquired by the National Art Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne)

see caption

PLATE II

“ON THE DART”

BY FRANCIS TOWNE

(In the possession of A. E. Hutton, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE III

“VILLAGE SCENE”

BY MICHAEL (ANGELO) ROOKER, A.R.A.

(In the possession of Victor Rienaecker, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE IV

“VIEW OF GLOUCESTER”

BY THOMAS HEARNE

(In the possession of Victor Rienaecker, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE V

“SCOTCH LANDSCAPE”

BY JOSEPH FARINGTON, R.A.

(In the possession of Victor Rienaecker, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE VI

“OLD PALACE YARD, WESTMINSTER,”

BY THOMAS MALTON, JUN.

(In the possession of R. W. Lloyd, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE VII

“FURNESS ABBEY, LANCASHIRE”

BY EDWARD DAYES

(In the possession of Victor Rienaecker, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE VIII

“PREPARING FOR MARKET”

BY FRANCIS WHEATLEY, R.A.,

(In the possession of Messrs. Thos. Agnew & Sons)

see caption

PLATE IX

“ENTRANCE TO VAUXHALL GARDENS”

BY THOMAS ROWLANDSON

(In the possession of Victor Rienaecker, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE X

“LAKE NEMI”

BY JOHN ROBERT COZENS

(In the possession of R. W. Lloyd, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE XI

LANDSCAPE

BY THOMAS GIRTIN

(In the possession of R. W. Lloyd, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE XII

“LUCERNE: MOONLIGHT”

BY J. M. W. TURNER, R.A.

(In the possession of R. W. Lloyd, Esq.)

see caption

PLATE XIII

“CLASSICAL SCENE”

BY JOHN SELL COTMAN

(In the possession of G. Bellingham Smith, Esq.)