Photography

New York, January 27, 1849. E. ANTHONY, ESQ.

This process is a discovery of Sir John Herschel and receives its name from the fact that both negative and positive photographs can be produced by one process. The positive pictures obtained by it have a perfect resemblance to impressions of engravings with common printer's ink. The process, although not yet fully carried out, promises to be of vast utility.

As in all cases of great and valuable inventions in science and art the English lay claim to the honor of having first discovered that of Photogenic drawing. But we shall see in the progress of this history, that like many other assumptions of their authors, priority in this is no more due them, then the invention of steamboats, or the cotton gin.

This claim is founded upon the fact that in 1802 Mr. Wedgwood recorded an experiment in the Journal of the Royal Institution of the following nature.

"The improvement to which you refer is denominated "The Crayon Daguerreotype." This invention made by Mr. J. A. Whipple, is the only improvement in Daguerreotyping, I believe, for which Letters Patent for the United States were ever issued. The pictures produced by this process--which is of the simplest description imaginable--have the appearance and effect of very fine "Crayon Drawings," from which the improvement takes its name. Some of our most distinguished artists have given it their unqualified admiration.

Some philosophers contend that to the existence of light alone we owe the beautiful effects produced by the Photogenic art, while others give sufficient reasons for doubting the correctness of the assumption. That the results are effected by a principle associated with light and not by the luminous principle itself, is the most probable conclusion. The importance of a knowledge of this fact becomes most essential in practice, as will presently be seen. To this principle Mr. Hunt gives the name of ENERGIA.

Having before noticed the fact that some advances had been made towards taking Daguerreotypes in color, by means of solar rays, and expressed the hope that the day was not far distant when this might be accomplished, I here subjoin Mr. Hunt's remarks on this subject.

There are very few who may not be capable of practising the Photographic art, either on paper, or metalic plates--but, like all other professions, some are more clever in its various processes than others.

Before taking leave of the subject of photogenic drawing, I must mention one or two facts, which may be of essential service to operators.

The entire Daguerreotype process is comprised in seven distinct operations; viz:

1.--Cleaning and polishing the plate.

2.--Applying the sensitive coating.

3--Submitting the plate to the action of light in the camera.

4.--Bringing out the picture; in other words rendering it visible.

5.--Fixing the image, or making it permanent--so that the light may no longer act upon it.

The Roman Astronomers state that they have procured Daguerreotype impressions of the Nebula of the sword of Orion.

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